Stop Smoking

We all know the statistics. Everywhere we look we can find research and evidence that tells us smoking and cigarettes are bad for our health.  Doctors tell us that we should stop smoking.  Some studies suggest that as many as two in three smokers would like to quit. Yet, it sometimes feels impossible.  For many people willpower alone is not enough to quit.

Many people want to  stop smoking, but success is somewhat hit or miss.  Where one person  quits “cold turkey,” another constantly starts over when their progress falters or fails.  When we struggle to reach our goals we become frustrated and potentially anxious.

Why is this?

What makes it so hard to stop smoking?

The Problem

First, let’s take a look at the problem and the bigger picture.

Those who smoke are far more likely to succumb to diseases including infertility, gum disease, heart disease, and cancer.  Among cancers, smoking has been associated with cancer of the lungs, mouth, throat, nose, blood, cervix and pancreas.  Those are a lot of potentially costly health problems that could cause you to consider to stop smoking.

However, the problem doesn’t end there.

Smoke doesn’t just affect the smoker. Others are affected as well. I have met so many parents/grandparents who avoid smoking around the children in their lives. While they want to quit, they cannot seem to kick the habit. While difficult to quit, there are many people out there who want to quit not just for themselves, but for those they care about.

A Few Of The Culprits

  • Nicotine can cause withdrawal symptoms and stimulates the brain to addiction. In addition, nicotine can cause smokers to struggle with intense cravings, anxiety, irritability and headaches.
  • Tar, the residue deposited in the lungs, can end up in the bloodstream and is carcinogenic.  Tar acts as an irritant to the body and often worsens the symptoms of Asthma and other similar breathing problems.  Finally, tar, in even small deposits has as many as 4000 chemicals and poisons.  Yuck.
  • Carbon Monoxide is a gas byproduct of cigarettes.  In the body, it prevents oxygen from traveling effectively through the bloodstream.  This can cause shortness of breath, low energy levels, and poor circulation.

The Benefits Of Quitting

Let’s take a quick look at the immediate and long-term benefits after you quit smoking.

  • 8 Hours: Excess carbon monoxide is out of your blood.
  • 5 Days: Most of the nicotine is out of your body.
  • 1 Week: Your sense of smell and taste begins to improve.
  • 1 Month: Skin problems associated with smoking begin to improve.
  • 3 Months: Lung function begins to improve.
  • 12 Months: Your risk of heart disease can be up to 50% lower by this point.
  • 1 Year: A pack-a-day smoker can save over $2800.
  • 5-15 Years: Your risk of stroke declines to around the same percentage as that of a nonsmoker.

In addition, there are other benefits to quitting:

  • More energy.
  • Improved immune system.
  • Longer life expectancy.
  • Better breathing.
  • Less Stress.
  • Younger looking skin.
  • More money.

Stop Smoking With Hypnosis

Whether a person considers themselves a heavy or a social smoker, quitting can be daunting.  While you may want to quit, you may struggle to go all day without a cigarette.  Sometimes you need a little help to give yourself the best chances of success. While there are many other options to quit including nicotine replacement therapy, many find hypnosis to be an effective method to stop smoking.

Hypnosis focuses on using your inner strengths to combat those challenging behaviors you wish to change. To do this we use suggestion to break the negative behaviors and thinking patterns we connect to smoking. These thoughts and behaviors are often what prevents someone from successfully giving up the habit.

When a person decides to stop smoking, they have to change their routine and perspective of cigarettes. This can be a huge challenge.  Society at large does not teach us how to modify our own thoughts to model better behaviors.  As hypnosis focuses on this change and its challenges, it is well adept at combating the struggles associated with quitting.

Hypnosis as a treatment is most effective when you want to quit for yourself.  Many people find that hypnosis to stop smoking is enough to break the habit, while others combine the treatment with nicotine replacement therapy.  This can tackle both the physical and the mental addiction.  When you explore your options with your hypnotist, you will discuss these options and decide the best option for your situation.

Furthermore, it is important to remember that this is not a quick fix. Hypnosis can work in just one session, while others feel that they benefit from follow-up sessions. The ultimate aim of hypnosis is to empower you to take control of all aspects of your well-being.  We do this by helping you promote healthier behaviors and new patterns of thinking that are conducive to your individual goals.

For more information see our How Hypnosis Works page.